Five Ways to Reduce Your Water Footprint

Reduce Water FootprintFive ways to reduce your water footprint

Water conservation may not be the first thing on your mind but with water use in the United States increasing every year, many regions of the country will experience water shortages this year, even under non-drought conditions.

But when it comes to water, shortages are only part of the problem. Even if your shop is located in a drought-free part of the country, water bills can unnecessarily drain money from your profits. Many water-saving steps take little effort or expense and can even have a positive impact on a customer’s experience.

In preparation for Earth Day 2017 on April 22, here are five simple ideas from Stockton Graham on how to reduce your water footprint and save money:

Install low-flow pre-rinse spray valves
For as little as $60, you can switch out the valves on your dishware sink faucet. Low-flow pre-rinse spray valves get the job done just as well as standard models but save a bundle in water costs, up to $1,000 each year depending on rate of use.

Use leak detection tablets to check for toilet leaks and fix them promptly
Repairing even a small toilet leak can save you $50 or more per year through lower water and sewer bills. Many municipalities offer free leak detection kits including tablets.

Don’t thaw frozen foods under running water
Putting the food in the refrigerator gets the job done, saves water and makes the food—especially pastries, desserts and breakfast breads—taste better.

Do not over brew
Analyze sales of drip coffee during your store’s slow time. Managing brewed coffee on-hand while keeping everything fresh can save several gallons of water per day. You’ll also reduce your amount of wasted coffee dramatically, which will have an even larger impact on your bottom line.

Turn off those dipper wells
Many independent shops were built and modeled after some chain concepts. This includes the installation of dipper wells for spoons, whisks, etc. While a dipper well does keep wares clean, they also send upwards of 120 gallons of water down the drain. Try using them on a slow trickle during busy periods, and turn them off the rest of the day.

Educate your staff and guests

To reduce your water footprint it’s important to share best management practices with your staff and encourage them to implement conservation measures. Conservation at your store starts with you, but management can’t do it alone!

For more information about best practices for your coffee shop, just call one of our Stockton Graham customer service reps at 800-835-5943 or email info@stocktongraham.com.

If You Want Good Coffee, Start With Good Water

good water for good coffeeWhen one thinks about a cup of coffee, the roasted bean is the first thing that comes to mind. Quality beans are certainly crucial, but equally important is the good water used because hot H2O is the solvent that leaches the flavors and oils out of those beans. A cup of regular coffee is about 98.75 percent water, leaving only 1.25 percent for the soluble plant matter, so it goes without saying poor water quality can ruin even the tastiest coffee beans. All the countless hours of work by farmers, roasters and numerous others involved in getting coffee to market are for naught if, in the end, the consumer brews their beverage with bad water.

It sounds simple to say water is just two hydrogen molecules for every one of oxygen, but the chemistry of water is actually very complex. Its makeup can change seasonally and because of other factors such as city water treatments, variable sources, nearby construction, etc. Water also has many gases and minerals dissolved in it, in addition to floating bacteria and dirt. A simple charcoal filter will remove things like dirt and odor but is not much help when it comes to mineral content. Much the same way it pulls flavors from coffee, water extracts minerals as it moves through the ground or in pipes. Some of those minerals, such as iron, can produce bad coffee tastes or colors. Some, on the other hand, can be good; coffee just tastes better when brewed with good water that has a fair amount of calcium dissolved in it. One measurement the Specialty Coffee Association of America uses to count the number of minerals dissolved in water is by measuring the total dissolved solids (TDS). calciumThe total dissolved solids are measured in parts dissolved solids, per million parts water (ppm). A TDS reading is partially a measure of whether water is what is considered soft or hard. The ideal range for TDS is between 125 and 175 ppm. Water with a very high TDS reading (hard) extracts coffee flavor less readily. The ideal range for calcium hardness is between 17 to 120 ppm. Things such as iron, chlorine and chlorinates should not be present in a reading. If your water does not fall into the desired range, the solution may be a water softening or filtration system.

Personal taste is always the most important factor when evaluating the quality of brewed coffee, but don’t forget tools can be used to help measure strength and extraction and allow for more taste control. Also, all water filtration systems have parts that must be replaced on a regular basis to ensure optimum performance. In general, replace carbon filters for in-line water filtration systems every three to six months. For reverse osmosis systems, the filters and membranes should be changed once every year. But these are just guidelines; anytime you notice debris or scale on your equipment, or detect odors or off-flavors, replace your filtering elements immediately.

waterAlways remember that with its thousands of different flavors and chemicals (such as caffeine), coffee is an extremely complex beverage. No good extraction of those desirable tastes is possible without good water. Do great coffee justice and make sure your water is held to the same high standard as your beans. For more information about using good water and proper filtration, call 800-835-5943 or email orders@stocktongraham.com.

It All Begins With a Good Espresso Machine

1920s espresso machine

A 1920s espresso machine in action.

The SCAA gives the definition of espresso as “a 25-35mL (.85-1.2oz [x2 for double]) beverage prepared from 7-9 grams (14-18 grams for a double) of coffee through which clean water of 195-205 degrees F has been forced at 9-10 atmospheres of pressure, and where the grind of the coffee is such that the brew time is 20-30 seconds.”

Espresso is the name used for all components of this beverage: From the beans to the brewing process, equipment, cups, accessories and served beverage. Heavily bodied coffee served in small cups has been around for centuries. There is evidence that it was served in Cairo as far back as the early fifteenth century. As the popularity of drinking coffee spread across cultures and throughout the world, new brewing methods and equipment began to spring up. French and Italian inventors began first experimenting with steam powered coffee brewing in the nineteenth century. It wasn’t until the twentieth century, however, that Italian inventors developed machines that could produce the drinks we today call espresso.

Espresso has become the foundation for numerous kinds of drinks. Some of these drinks include milk, such as lattes, mochas and cappuccinos. More recently, espresso has become the foundation for carbonated beverages and mixed drinks including alcohol. Regardless of the finished beverage, the espresso component should always be made according to Specialty Coffee Association of America preparation guidelines.

espresso pouringPulling the Perfect Shot
Baristas refer to the extraction process as “pulling” a shot. Most baristas primarily pull 2 oz. double espressos, which is what we recommend. Pulling the perfect shot will require an adequate espresso machine, quality coffee used, a proper grind, and a well-trained barista.

The Machine
Choose an espresso machine that can maintain a constant brewing temperature of 195° to 205ºF. Your machine should also be capable of delivering water to the ground espresso at a pressure of 9-10 atmospheres.

The Coffee
Any coffee can be used to make espresso, but for best results use a coffee that was selected or blended specifically for espresso.

The Dose
The dose refers to the amount of ground beans that are dispensed into the portafilter. The word “dosing” refers to the process of grinding coffee into the portafilter basket.  Be sure your dose uses the correct amount of ground beans.  There is no hard-and fast rule for dosing, but consistency is key to maintaining shot time and flavor.  The SCAA recommends these dosing weights:

Singles: 7-9 grams ground espresso
Doubles: 14-18 grams ground espresso
Triples: 21-24 grams ground espresso (usually only used for certain size milk-based drinks)

The Grinder
Coffee must be ground just before use for best freshness and flavor. The grinder should be adjusted by the barista as needed in order to maintain the timing of their espresso shots.

The Time
Extraction begins the moment your ground coffee comes in contact with water. The SCAA
recommends a brewing time of 20-30 seconds as a general guideline. This applies whether pulling one or two shots. We recommend grind adjustment if you find your shots are pulling too slowly or quickly.

The 20-30 second guideline should be used as a starting point, since different coffees taste best at different times.  The ultimate test is in the taste. Let the taste and appearance be your markers for a good espresso.

Tamping espressoProper Tamping

  • Elbow at 90° angle
  • 30-40 lbs. of pressure (Use a floor scale to practice pressure application)
  • To ensure proper extraction of entire dose, tamp coffee in the portafilter so it is even and level.

These are just a few words of advice and we can happily provide more. For exceptional espresso, it is essential to maintain correct and consistent preparation cup after cup, customer after customer. The ultimate test is in the taste so the real secret is a simple one: practice!

Towels
Your espresso machine area should be equipped with at least three clean cloths. Each cloth should only be used for its intended purpose in order to avoid cross-contamination:

  1. Steamwand cloth: a damp cloth used only to clean the steamwand. Change several times per shift. Check local health department requirements regarding use of sanitizer.
  2. Portafilter cloth: a dry cloth used only to clean and dry portafilter baskets and spouts before dosing freshly ground coffee.
  3. Bench cloth: a damp cloth or bar mop used for cleaning up spills and ground coffee from the countertop. Change often. Check local health department requirements regarding use of sanitizer.

From more information about proper methods for making espresso, just call 800-835-5943 or email orders@stocktongraham.com.